With Factor One Source Pharmacy,
your specialty prescription is our number one factor.

We serve patients with chronic medical conditions that require detailed specialized medication management.

We are accessible, honest, and here for you.

-24/7 Pharmacist Access
-Refill Reminders
-Patient Dispensing Navigation
-Patient Care Management
-Financial Counseling

CONSUMER ADVOCACY

At Factor One Source FAST Pharmacy, we encourage our patients to advocate for themselves and their loved ones. With extensive experience on Capitol Hill and relationships with elected representatives, legislative committees, and influence on healthcare industry officials, we want to help you learn how to advocate for yourselves on local and national levels.

PATIENT CARE SERVICES

A large part of what separates a specialty pharmacy from a retail pharmacy are the outcomes that are monitored by the Pharmacist.

At Factor One Source FAST Pharmacy we track your outcomes, hospital visits, doctor visits, medication compliance, side effects, and reactions all so we can tailor the best therapy and recommendations specific for YOU.

FINANCIAL COUNSELING

Chronic illness and conditions are very costly, and we know that it takes a great deal of coordination to make sure your needs are met. At Factor One Source FAST Pharmacy, we offer free financial counseling regarding your medical needs, and help you become educated and empowered as you obtain treatment for your medical needs.

3

LOCATIONS

50

STATES WE SERVE

65

STAFF MEMBERS

100

CUSTOMER SERVICE RATING

Latest News

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Monthly Education: Stress

Reducing your stress levels can not only make you feel better right now, but may also protect your health longterm. In one study, researchers examined the association between “positive affect” — feelings like happiness, joy, contentment and enthusiasm — and the development of coronary heart disease over a decade.  They found that for every one-point increase in positive affect on a five-point scale, the rate of heart disease dropped by 22 percent. While the study doesn’t prove that increasing positive affect decreases cardiovascular risks, the researchers recommend boosting your positive affect by making a little time for enjoyable activities every day. Other strategies for reducing stress include: • Identify what’s causing stress. Monitor your state of mind throughout the day. If you feel stressed, write down the cause, your thoughts and your mood. Once you know what’s bothering you, develop a plan for addressing it. • Build strong relationships. Relationships can be a source of stress. Research has found that negative, hostile reactions with your spouse cause immediate changes in stress-sensitive hormones, for example. • Walk away when you’re angry. Before you react, take time to regroup by counting to 10. Then reconsider. Walking or other physical activities can also help you work off steam. Plus, exercise increases the production of endorphins, your body’s natural mood-booster. Commit to a daily walk or other form of exercise — a small step that can make a big difference in reducing stress levels. • Rest your mind. According to APA’s 2012 Stress in America™ survey, stress keeps more than 40 percent of adults lying awake at night. To help ensure you get the recommended seven or eight hours of shut-eye, cut back on caffeine, remove distractions such as television or computers from your bedroom, and go to bed at the same time each night. Research shows that activities like yoga and relaxation exercises not only help reduce stress, but also boost immune functioning. • Get help. If you continue to feel overwhelmed, consult with a psychologist or other licensed mental health professional who can help you learn how to manage stress effectively. [pdf-embedder url="http://fosrx.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Stress-Handout.pdf" title="Stress Handout"]

Monthly Education: Preventing Falls

Falls can be prevented! Take action and be prepared If You Fall Try to land on your buttocks to prevent more serious injuries. Don't rush to get up. Make sure you are not injured before trying to get up or letting others help you get up. Don't let the fear of falling again prevent you from being active. Inactivity creates an even greater risk of falling. Protect Yourself Anyone can fall. But as we age, our risk of falling becomes greater. That's the bad news. The good news is that falls can be prevented. The first step to avoiding falls is to understand what causes them. For example, poor balance, decreased muscle and bone strength, reduced vision or hearing, and unsafe conditions in and around your home can increase your chance of falling. Staying safe and on your feet is a matter of taking some steps to protect yourself. You can prevent falls by making the needed adjustments to your home and lifestyle, and by making sure you eat well, stay fit, and use whatever devices will facilitate your daily life while keeping you safe. Your independence and well-being are at stake. Take action!
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Monthly Education Topic: Hand Hygiene

Hand Washing and Hand Sanitizer Use at Home, at Play, and Out and About

Germs are everywhere! They can get onto hands and items we touch during daily activities and make you sick. Cleaning hands at key times with soap and water or hand sanitizer is one of the most important steps you can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to those around you. There are important differences between washing hands with soap and water and cleaning them with hand sanitizer. For example, alcohol-based hand sanitizers don’t kill ALL types of germs, such as a stomach bug called norovirus, some parasites, and Clostridium difficile, which causes severe diarrhea. Hand sanitizers also may not remove harmful chemicals, such as pesticides and heavy metals like lead. Handwashing reduces the amounts of all types of germs, pesticides, and metals on hands. Knowing when to clean your hands and which method to use will give you the best chance of preventing sickness.

When should I use?

Soap and Water:

• Before, during, and after preparing food

• Before eating food

• Before and after caring for someone who is sick

• Before and after treating a cut or wound

• After using the bathroom, changing diapers, or cleaning up a child who has used the bathroom

• After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing

• After touching an animal, animal food or treats, animal cages, or animal waste

• After touching garbage

• If your hands are visibly dirty or greasy

Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer:

• Before and after visiting a friend or a loved one in a hospital or nursing home, unless the person is sick with Clostridium difficile (if so, use soap and water to wash hands).

• If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol, and wash with soap and water as soon as you can.

* Do NOT use hand sanitizer if your hands are visibly dirty or greasy: for example, after gardening, playing outdoors, or after fishing or camping (unless a handwashing station is not available). Wash your hands with soap and water instead.

How should I use?

Soap and Water:

• Wet your hands with clean running water (warm or cold) and apply soap.

• Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap.

• Scrub all surfaces of your hands, including the palms, backs, fingers, between your fingers, and under your nails. Keep scrubbing for 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song twice.

• Rinse your hands under clean, running water.

• Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer:

Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Supervise young children when they use hand sanitizer to prevent swallowing alcohol, especially in schools and childcare facilities.

• Apply. Put enough product on hands to cover all surfaces.

• Rub hands together, until hands feel dry. This should take around 20 seconds.

Note: Do not rinse or wipe off the hand sanitizer before it’s dry; it may not work as well against germs.

For more information, visit the CDC hand washing website, www.cdc.gov/handwashing.