Monthly Education Topic: Hand Hygiene

Hand Washing and Hand Sanitizer Use at Home, at Play, and Out and About

Germs are everywhere! They can get onto hands and items we touch during daily activities and make you sick. Cleaning hands at key times with soap and water or hand sanitizer is one of the most important steps you can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to those around you. There are important differences between washing hands with soap and water and cleaning them with hand sanitizer. For example, alcohol-based hand sanitizers don’t kill ALL types of germs, such as a stomach bug called norovirus, some parasites, and Clostridium difficile, which causes severe diarrhea. Hand sanitizers also may not remove harmful chemicals, such as pesticides and heavy metals like lead. Handwashing reduces the amounts of all types of germs, pesticides, and metals on hands. Knowing when to clean your hands and which method to use will give you the best chance of preventing sickness.

When should I use?

Soap and Water:

• Before, during, and after preparing food

• Before eating food

• Before and after caring for someone who is sick

• Before and after treating a cut or wound

• After using the bathroom, changing diapers, or cleaning up a child who has used the bathroom

• After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing

• After touching an animal, animal food or treats, animal cages, or animal waste

• After touching garbage

• If your hands are visibly dirty or greasy

Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer:

• Before and after visiting a friend or a loved one in a hospital or nursing home, unless the person is sick with Clostridium difficile (if so, use soap and water to wash hands).

• If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol, and wash with soap and water as soon as you can.

* Do NOT use hand sanitizer if your hands are visibly dirty or greasy: for example, after gardening, playing outdoors, or after fishing or camping (unless a handwashing station is not available). Wash your hands with soap and water instead.

How should I use?

Soap and Water:

• Wet your hands with clean running water (warm or cold) and apply soap.

• Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap.

• Scrub all surfaces of your hands, including the palms, backs, fingers, between your fingers, and under your nails. Keep scrubbing for 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song twice.

• Rinse your hands under clean, running water.

• Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer:

Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Supervise young children when they use hand sanitizer to prevent swallowing alcohol, especially in schools and childcare facilities.

• Apply. Put enough product on hands to cover all surfaces.

• Rub hands together, until hands feel dry. This should take around 20 seconds.

Note: Do not rinse or wipe off the hand sanitizer before it’s dry; it may not work as well against germs.

For more information, visit the CDC hand washing website, www.cdc.gov/handwashing.

Monthly Education Topic: Osteoporosis

What is Osteoporosis?

Worldwide, one in three women and one in five men aged 50 years and over will suffer an osteoporotic fracture. Osteoporosis causes bones to become weak and fragile, so that they break easily – even as a result of a minor fall, a bump, a sneeze, or a sudden movement. Fractures caused by osteoporosis can be life-threatening and a major cause of pain and long-term disability.

Prevention

Can osteoporosis and fractures be prevented? Yes, if action is taken early! Read the information provided here to learn which steps you can take to build strong bones throughout life and avoid osteoporotic fractures.

The Care Gap

Fractures due to osteoporosis have a devastating impact on millions of people worldwide and result in enormous socio-economic costs to society and healthcare systems. Yet, despite effective medical advances to reduce fractures, a minority of men and women actually receive treatment. Only 10% of older women with fractures actually receive osteoporosis therapy. In 2010, in Europe alone some 12.3 million people considered to be at a high risk for osteoporotic fractures were left untreated.

 

The 5 steps to healthy bones and a fracture-free future

1. Exercise regularly

Weight-bearing, muscle-strengthening and balance-training exercises are best.

2. Ensure a diet rich in bone-healthy nutrients

Calcium, vitamin D and protein are the most important for bone health. Safe exposure to sunshine will help you get enough vitamin D.

3. Avoid negative lifestyle habits

Maintain a healthy body weight, avoid smoking and excessive drinking.

4. Find out whether you have risk factors

and bring these to your doctor’s attention, especially if you’ve had a previous fracture or have specific diseases and medications that affect bone health.

5. Get tested and treated if needed

If you’re at high risk you will likely need medication to ensure optimal protection against fracture.

Have risk factors? Talk to your doctor, ask for testing.

To become aware of any potential risk factors, take the IOF One-Minute Osteoporosis Risk Test.

If you are over the age of 50 and you have one or more risk factors you should discuss these with your doctor and ask for an assessment of your bone health status. Lifestyle changes may be recommended and, for those at high risk, medication may be prescribed for optimal protection against fractures.

 

Source: http://worldosteoporosisday.org/about-osteoporosis

Extreme Heat

It’s HOT out there! 

It is very important that we take the proper precautions to protect ourselves from the effects of the sun and extreme heat!

Here are some easy guides from the CDC to reference for your Summer Safety:

Extreme Heat .PDF

Sun Safety – Skin Cancer Info

If you have any questions or need more information on Sun Safety and Extreme Heat Awareness you can reach us by calling 877-327-8881.

Cover Up and Stay Cool!

National Safety Month

June, 2017

 

Do you have questions or concerns about safe disposal of your specialty medication?

We’ve compiled some easy resources to help you find the best practices.

To find a quick recommendation on medication disposal, use the information in the following links:

FDA Guidelines: “Do’s and Don’ts: Safe Disposal of Needles and Other Sharps Used At Home, At Work, or While Traveling”

Safe Needle Disposal: Be smart with sharps

For state specific guidelines and to find local collection sites in your area, use the following link:

Safe Needle Disposal Near You

The DEA offers medication take back days two times a year. To find the next available date and location visit the DEA website here.

If you have any questions or need more information on safe disposal of medications you can reach us at 877-327-8881.

Be safe out there!

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