2018 FOSRX/FAST Pharmacy Scholarship Winners Announced 

Factor One Source FAST Pharmacy (FOSRX/FAST) announced today that it has selected four worthy recipients to award a combined worth of $11,000 of scholarships for the 2018-2019 school year to: Isaiah Reeves of Iowa City, Josh Williams of New Albany, OH, Emily Manning of Tallahassee, FL, and Chance Abrams of Birmingham AL. All past and current recipients of the FOSRX/FAST Scholarship not only demonstrate extraordinary academic, extracurricular, and personal backgrounds, they also all live with chronic illnesses. The FOSRX/FAST scholarship program is part of an FOSRX/FAST initiative to support people living with life-long disorders/diseases to achieve academic success despite their diagnoses. “Providing these scholarships will help the lives of four exceptional and deserving people who show promising futures despite challenging life circumstances,” FOSRX/FAST CEO, Sajal Roy said. “They are capable of achieving great things in their future college experiences and represent our company values well.”
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Monthly Education: Hepatitis

Hepatitis is an inflammatory disease of the liver which can lead to scarring, cirrhosis, or cancer of the liver. Hepatitis is also caused by other toxic substances and autoimmune disease which can present similar to viral hepatitis. There are 5 main hepatitis viruses, referred to as types A, B, C, D and E. These 5 types are of greatest concern because of the burden of illness and death they cause and the potential for outbreaks and epidemic spread. To see more information, click here.

Monthly Education: Tuberculosis

Patients who receive biologics such as Humira, Enbrel, Actemra, etc. are at an increased risk for serious infections which may result in hospitalization and/or death. Tuberculosis may lie dormant in the body for years without notice. Biologics are medications that may suppress the immune systems function. Suppression of the immune system increases the risk that the infection will become more active.

References:

https://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/treatments/medication/drug-types/biologics/precautions-biologics.php https://www.cdc.gov/tb/publications/factsheets/testing/skintesting.htm https://www.cdc.gov/tb/publications/factsheets/general/tb.pdf

Scholarship FAQs

Have you heard about our scholarship program? Every year our company gives thousands of dollars away to people living with chronic/complex medical conditions seeking higher education. You can learn more on our Scholarship Page, here. We are currently taking applications, which means we get a lot of phone calls at this time of year to ask questions or clarify certain eligibility requirements. We'd like to tackle the most common questions in this post today.
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Monthly Education: Nutrition

March is National Nutrition Month. We acknowledge that it is also Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month and Bleeding Disorders Awareness Month among other things, but have chosen to focus on nutrition this year during the month of March since it affects all patients regardless of their condition. Nutrition Month, created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, focuses on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits. We loved this list of 27 Health and Nutrition Tips based on science, and encourage you to read it for the great advice and explanations. The list recommends things like: eating nuts, minimizing your intake of added sugars, using extra virgin olive oil, remembering to do cardio, avoiding bright lights before sleep, not overcooking/burning your meat, drinking water before meals, eating fatty fish, etc. etc. At FOSRX/FAST, we encourage everyone to set nutritional goal that they can make steps to achieve this month through healthy eating. Share your goal with us on social media @fosrxfast! [pdf-embedder url="http://fosrx.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/EatRightWithMyPlate-3-18.pdf" title="EatRightWithMyPlate 3-18"]  

Monthly Education: American Heart Month

February is American Heart Month. Not only should we focus on those we hold close to our hearts during the month of love, but also focus on loving ourselves by taking good care of our actual non-metaphorical hearts. Simply put, taking care of yourself can lead to a longer, healthier life. There are seven simple steps that research has shown can make a difference. Each involves making good choices and require some discipline, but all are doable. Dubbed “Life’s Simple 7” by the American Heart Association, they involve:
  • Eating better, which can stave off chronic disease. Steps include increasing your intake of vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds.
  • Maintaining a healthy weight because this can reduce the burden on your heart, lungs, blood vessels and bones.
  • Exercising, which can help with your cholesterol levels, weight and muscle tone.
  • Quitting cigarettes because even one can hurt you.
  • Managing blood pressure. Unhealthy ranges strain the heart, arteries and kidneys.
  • Controlling cholesterol to give your arteries the best chance to stay clear of fatty blockages that reduce blood flow.
  • Reducing blood sugar. This can lower the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease.
[pdf-embedder url="http://fosrx.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/February-Education.pdf" title="February Education"]

Monthly Education: Stress

Reducing your stress levels can not only make you feel better right now, but may also protect your health longterm. In one study, researchers examined the association between “positive affect” — feelings like happiness, joy, contentment and enthusiasm — and the development of coronary heart disease over a decade.  They found that for every one-point increase in positive affect on a five-point scale, the rate of heart disease dropped by 22 percent. While the study doesn’t prove that increasing positive affect decreases cardiovascular risks, the researchers recommend boosting your positive affect by making a little time for enjoyable activities every day. Other strategies for reducing stress include: • Identify what’s causing stress. Monitor your state of mind throughout the day. If you feel stressed, write down the cause, your thoughts and your mood. Once you know what’s bothering you, develop a plan for addressing it. • Build strong relationships. Relationships can be a source of stress. Research has found that negative, hostile reactions with your spouse cause immediate changes in stress-sensitive hormones, for example. • Walk away when you’re angry. Before you react, take time to regroup by counting to 10. Then reconsider. Walking or other physical activities can also help you work off steam. Plus, exercise increases the production of endorphins, your body’s natural mood-booster. Commit to a daily walk or other form of exercise — a small step that can make a big difference in reducing stress levels. • Rest your mind. According to APA’s 2012 Stress in America™ survey, stress keeps more than 40 percent of adults lying awake at night. To help ensure you get the recommended seven or eight hours of shut-eye, cut back on caffeine, remove distractions such as television or computers from your bedroom, and go to bed at the same time each night. Research shows that activities like yoga and relaxation exercises not only help reduce stress, but also boost immune functioning. • Get help. If you continue to feel overwhelmed, consult with a psychologist or other licensed mental health professional who can help you learn how to manage stress effectively. [pdf-embedder url="http://fosrx.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Stress-Handout.pdf" title="Stress Handout"]

Monthly Education: Preventing Falls

Falls can be prevented! Take action and be prepared If You Fall Try to land on your buttocks to prevent more serious injuries. Don't rush to get up. Make sure you are not injured before trying to get up or letting others help you get up. Don't let the fear of falling again prevent you from being active. Inactivity creates an even greater risk of falling. Protect Yourself Anyone can fall. But as we age, our risk of falling becomes greater. That's the bad news. The good news is that falls can be prevented. The first step to avoiding falls is to understand what causes them. For example, poor balance, decreased muscle and bone strength, reduced vision or hearing, and unsafe conditions in and around your home can increase your chance of falling. Staying safe and on your feet is a matter of taking some steps to protect yourself. You can prevent falls by making the needed adjustments to your home and lifestyle, and by making sure you eat well, stay fit, and use whatever devices will facilitate your daily life while keeping you safe. Your independence and well-being are at stake. Take action!
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